We work with clients and individual leaders from a variety of industries in both the public and private sectors. Our approach is driven strongly by clients needs yet brings an experience based confidence in what works and doesn’t work when it comes to generating, embedding, and sustaining innovation in an organization. Following are some of the precepts from which we operate.

  • Innovation must be viewed as a tool not a destination
  • The ability to understand and follow 7 key steps determines the success or failure of an innovation initiative
  • Leading innovation requires a different and unique set of skills that are not typically found in most organizational leaders
  • Organizations have to embrace an entrepreneurial orientation towards innovation if new ideas are to create value
  • The human brain is hard wired for innovation and is the raw material from which all new ideas must spring. But organizations often need to employ certain “jolting” techniques to unleash this human potential
  • Structures and processes for generating, embedding, & sustaining innovation depend upon the organization’s
  • choices around risk/reward. Organizations must decide in which of 3 innovation arenas (Derivative, Platform, Breakthrough) they need to operate so that the tool of innovation provides the desired results

  • Most brainstorming techniques do not yield good results because they typically involve the same people in the
  • same room with same opinions and the same politics they had last week. ISI’s approach to generating new ideas is different

  • New ideas are not always welcome guests as they often bring out the organizations antibodies. Thus companies embarking on an innovation path must develop defensive mechanisms to counter balance them.
  • Some of the best new ideas come from outside the organization. Thus companies need to think about investing in “open innovation” platforms
  • Before embarking on an innovation strategy, it is important to assess the “Innovation Friendliness” of the company culture. ISI has developed a proprietary instrument, called the ILS (Innovation Landscape Survey) to assess the degree of difficulty an idea will have in the implementation and infusion phases.
  • Many companies believe that they must change the organization’s culture in order to evoke greater innovation orientation. Culture change can be long and painful and the executives who actually started it are often no longer around to make sure it is sustained. ISI believes that entrepreneurially driven innovation can actually be a much more precise and powerful tool for cultural change rather than trying to change the culture first.